Fr Federico Lombardi: Pope Emeritus will not participate in the Mass to inaugurate the New Papacy

March 13th, 2013

 

Turning then to the negative result of the first three scrutinies, Fr. Lombardi said: “Yesterday nobody was expecting a white “fumata”, nor today either. This is very normal. Looking back over the Conclaves held in the last century, only Pius XII, at the outset of the Second World War, was elected at the first scrutiny.” He also explained that, in his opinion, none of the cardinals participating in the Conclave are ill. “The rapidity of the vote shows it. Making use of the ‘Infirmarii’ (those who bring one of the voting urns to any cardinals who are too ill to attend the proceedings in the Sistine Chapel) would require more time. That is why I think that they are all within the Sistine Chapel.”

After the tremendous quantities of black smoke produced at yesterday evening’s “fumata”, many asked about the chemical compound used to obtain it. All that information is available in yesterday’s VIS service. Today Fr. Lombardi clarified: “The smoke didn’t damage any of Michelangelo’s frescos or endanger the health of the cardinals. The prelates are all doing well, are in good spirits, and this morning some even walked to the Pauline Chapel, where they celebrated Mass before entering the Sistine Chapel.”

He also noted that, still referring to yesterday, he greeted Archbishop Georg Ganswein, prefect of the Pontifical Household and personal secretary of Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, who told him that the Pope is carefully following the events of these days and that he listened to the “pro eligendo Romano Pontifice” Mass celebrated at the Vatican Basilica yesterday, which was presided over by the Cardinal dean of the College of Cardinals, Cardinal Angelo Sodano. Fr. Lombardi added that the Pope emeritus will not participate in the Mass to inaugurate the new papacy and that, although Archbishop Ganswein will remain at the Vatican until the conclusion of the Conclave, Benedict XVI has the assistance of another personal secretary at Castel Gandolfo.

To give an idea of the atmosphere in the Conclave, Fr. Lombardi repeated a few words from the German Cardinal Karl Lehman, who has previously participated in another Conclave. Before entering the one in process, he explained that the atmosphere inside the Sistine Chapel is not cold or overly ceremonial but of a great spirituality and, at the same time, solemnity. “They slowly approach the altar with their ballot well-visible and, [after swearing the conviction of his vote], each also returns to his seat slowly. The cardinals do not speak loudly and the atmosphere, presided over by Michelangelo’s ‘Final Judgement’ gives a very strong impression that cannot be overlooked,” the cardinal reported.

Fr. Lombardi then spoke of how the cardinals pass their time at the Domus Sanctae Marthae. He said that the electors have complete freedom to use the time as they see fit: resting, praying in the chapel, exchanging opinions in order to arrive at their choice, etc….